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Posts Tagged ‘kayak’

The biggest conundrum we have with kayaking is getting to the water. The bay is “just” across the street… the only catch is that the ‘street’ is US 31, a 4-lane divided highway.

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The process to get into the water is: wheel kayaks out of the garage, down the driveway, on the sidewalk, accross on leg of the highway, into the median, then safely across to the beach.

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The ‘getting-there’ is a bit of a chore, but the reward sure is worth it!

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David built his kayak from a kit. You can read more about it in this previous post. To see these pictures in full-size, please visit my flickr page.

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Kayak West Bay (12)A weekend paddle on West Bay was a great way to beat the heat and get out on the water. The wispy  clouds in the sky and deep blue-green water made for a stunning backdrop. I had to pinch myself a few times to remind me that I actually live here! It felt surreal to paddle around in the beautiful setting. We are lucky to be able to wheel the kayaks down to the bay from our house, with one hiccup: The Parkway. It’s a bit stressful to cross the highway with the kayaks and we would go a lot more if it were easier to cross. One advantage is that because it’s a divided highway, we can cross 2 lanes, wait in the median, then finish crossing the final 2 lanes. The boats are sea kayaks and are really long, so we have to turn horizontal while waiting in the median.

Kayak West Bay (10)The Manitou Tall Ship was out for a sail including several other vessels that were also enjoying the bay.

Kayak West Bay (4)Both kayak hulls and decks are made out of 4mm-okoume plywood and are sheathed with fiberglass. In fact, David made his from a kit. It’s a Chesapeake Light Craft. I found mine in the classified section in the paper a few years ago. Both boats are very sea (bay) worthy.

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